Heartbleed

The recently exposed heartbleed bug in the OpenSSL library has surprised everyone with a catastrophic vulnerability in many of the world’s secure systems.

In common with many other SSL-exposed services, some freenode servers were running vulnerable versions of OpenSSL, exposing us to this exploit. Consequently, all of our affected services have been patched to mitigate the vulnerability, and we have also regenerated our private SSL keys and certificates.

In an unrelated event, due to service disruption & the misconfiguration of a single server on our network, an unauthorised user was allowed to use the ‘NickServ’ nickname for a short period Sunday morning. Unfortunately there is a possibility that your client sent data (including your freenode services password) to this unauthorised client. Identification via SASL, certfp or server password were not affected, but any password sent directly to the “NickServ” user might have been.

Because of these two recent issues, we would like to make the following recommendations to all of our users. It would also be good practice to follow them at regular intervals.

  • Though we are not aware of any evidence that we have been targeted, or our private key compromised, this is inevitably a possibility. SSL sessions established prior to 2014/04/12 may be vulnerable. If your current connection was established prior to this date via ssl then you should consider reconnecting to the network.
  • We would advise that users reset their password (after reconnecting) using instructions returned by the following command:

/msg nickserv help set password

This should help ensure that if your password was compromised through an exploitation of the Heartbleed vulnerability, the damage is limited.

  • In line with general best practice, we would always recommend using separate passwords on separate systems – if you shared your freenode services password with other systems, you should change your password on all of these systems; preferably into individual ones.
  • If you use CertFP, you should regenerate your client certificate (instructionsand ensure that you update NickServ with the new certificate hash. You can find out how to do this using the following command:

/msg nickserv help cert

  • Having changed passwords and/or certificate hashes, it cannot hurt to verify your other authentication methods (such as email, ACCESS or CERT). It is possible you have additional access methods configured either from past use or (less likely) due to an account compromise.
  • Finally, it is worth noting that although probably the least likely attack vector, Heartbleed can also be used as client-side attack, i.e. if you are still running a vulnerable client a server could attack you. This could be a viable attack if, for instance, you connect to a malicious IRC server and freenode at the same time; hypothetically the malicious IRC server could then attack your client and steal your IRC password or other data. If affected, you should ensure your OpenSSL install is updated and not vulnerable then restart your client.

As ever, staff are available in #freenode to respond to any questions or concerns.

+freenode

UPDATE: This was of course an April Fool… you can “/msg nickserv set property GOOGLE+” to remove the property from your account. There might still be other secrets within the message though…

freenode4

Edit: Previous versions of the post contained an incorrect NickServ command. We have corrected this and apologise for the inconvenience.

Turbulence

As many of you will be aware, freenode has been experiencing intermittent instability today, as the network has been under attack. Whilst we have network services back online, the network continues to be a little unreliable and users are continuing to report issues in connecting to the network.

We appreciate the patience of our many wonderful users whilst we continue to work to mitigate the effects this has on the network.

We also greatly appreciate our many sponsors who work with us to help minimise the impact and who are themselves affected by attacks against the network.

We’ve posted on this subject before, and what we said then remains as true as ever – and for those of you who didn’t read the earlier blogpost first time round, it’s definitely worth perusing it now if this subject interests or affects you.

Thank you all for your patience as we continue to work to restore normal service!

[UPDATE 04/02/2014]

At the moment SASL authentication works only on PLAINTEXT, *not* BLOWFISH. We’ve checked and TOR should be working too. Sadly wolfe.freenode.net will be taken off the rotation, so those users who’ve connected specifically to it, please make sure that your client points to our recommended roundrobin of chat.freenode.net!

Reminder: Keep your NickServ email up to date.

If you’ve registered with NickServ within the last few years then you’ll have used an email address and we’ll have sent you a mail to verify it. That will probably be the last time you heard from us…

…until you forget your password and find yourself unable to identify to your account. When that happens we can send an email (only to that same address) to verify your identify and reset your password.

You aren’t stuck with the email you originally used though! We’d very strongly recommend you take 5 minutes to double check the set email address is current, especially in light of recent service closures. You don’t need access to your old inbox to change your registered email, just your NickServ password.

To view the current state of your account, while identified type:

/msg nickserv info

If you’d like to then change the registered email address, first…

/msg nickserv set email [email protected]

… then check your email inbox. We’ll have sent you another email with instructions to verify this new address.

Your email address is hidden from other users by default. You can ensure this by setting:

/msg nickserv set hidemail on

Thanks for using freenode!

Server hosting and trust

For the purpose of disclosure we have had to make the difficult decision to discontinue a long-standing relationship with a server sponsor.

As a freenode user you may be aware that our set-up is somewhat untraditional and differs from that of many other IRC networks; servers are sponsored by various companies and educational institutions across the globe and all our infrastructure is centrally managed by the freenode infrastructure team. Generally speaking we do not provide o:lines or other privileges to server sponsors. Whilst it is possible for a sponsor contact to also volunteer as a staffer on the network such recruitment is independent of any server hosting.

Our staff are expected to work together closely and communication is key in any freenode relationship, be that with users, among staff or with sponsor contacts. It is important to us to be consistent in the way we provide support and apply policy and we expect all volunteers to be intimately familiar with our policies, procedures and philosophies — which in turn means that senior staff invest a lot of time in ensuring that any new recruits are given adequate support when getting to know the ins and outs of the network and what being a freenode volunteer entails.

Unfortunately one of our server sponsors added an o:line for themselves on the server they sponsored and whilst we do not believe that this was done with any malicious intent, more through thoughtlessness/negligence and having forgotten the expectations set out on our “Hosting a Server” page we feel that we are unable to comfortably and confidently continue the relationship.

Our number one priority has to be our target communities, the Free and Open Source Software communities that have chosen to make use of freenode in their internet activities.

Whilst we do not believe and have no evidence to indicate that any user traffic or data has been compromised, we would of course encourage you to change your passwords if you feel that this would make you more comfortable in continuing to use our services.

We can only apologise for this happening and we’d like to assure you that trust is incredibly important to us and that we are incredibly embarassed that this situation arose in the first place.

As a result of this we have just replaced our SSL certificates, so if you notice that these have changed then this is the reason why.

We will of course take this opportunity to remind all our sponsors of our expectations when it comes to providing services to freenode and our target communities.

Again, we apologise for any inconvenience and we hope that any loss of trust in the network that may have resulted from this incidence can be restored and that your projects will continue to feel comfortable using the network in future.

 

 

Fosscon, an open source conference in Philadelphia PA, Saturday August 10th

FOSSCON 2013 will be held on August 10th, 2013.  Several of our very own staff here at freenode will be attending this year and we are really looking forward to it.

FOSSCON was spawned from the depths of freenode and this will be the 4th event so far.

We are very excited about this year’s keynote speaker, Philadelphia’s own Jordan Miller, who leads a research team at The University of Pennsylvania. Jordan makes heavy use of open source software and is doing amazing work with 3D printing as it pertains to transplant organs.  http://www.upenn.edu/pennnews/news/penn-researchers-improve-living-tissues-3d- printed-vascular-networks-made-sugar.

Listed below is a just a quick peek at some of our confirmed speakers and their topics:

  • Bhavani Shankar will be speaking on how to bring in new developers to open source projects.
  • Elizabeth Krumbach Joseph will be speaking on Open Source Systems Administration.
  • Corey Quinn will be speaking on configuration management with Salt.
  • Brent Saner will be speaking on Project.Phree, a wireless mesh project.
  • Dru Lavigne will be speaking on FreeNAS 9.1.
  • Jérôme Jacovella-St-Louis will be hosting a workshop on cross-platform development with the Ecere SDK.
  • John Ashmead will be speaking on the math and science of invisibility.
  • John Stumpo will be offering a workshop on the Challenges facing FOSS game projects.
  • Walt Mankowski will be speaking on Scientific Programming with NumPy and SciPy.
  • Chris Nehren will be speaking on bridging the gap between development and operations.
  • Christina Simmons will be speaking on starting and managing open source events/projects.
  • Hector Castro will be offering a hands-on workshop on the Riak database engine.
  • Dan Langille will be hosting a workshop on Bacula: The Networked Backup Open Source Solution

If you haven’t registered yet, please do so here: https://www.wepay.com/events/fosscon-2013!  We’ve had such an awesome response so far and are so excited to see how far we can go this year! Invite your friends, your partners, your business associates, and everyone else you know!  We’ll see you soon!

New TLS/SSL Channel Modes & Webchat Features

We’ve recently enabled some new functionality in our ircd to further help you manage your channels:

Channel mode +S

This ensures only users that have connected via TLS/SSL (and so have user mode +Z) are able to join; you can not /invite them through it. It will not prevent the use of the channel by any non-TLS/SSL users already present.

Extended ban $z

Documented in ‘/help extban’ for some time, this has also been enabled and matches all TLS/SSL users. Usage is similar to the ‘$a’ type (which matches all identified users) and could for example be set as ‘+q $~z’ to to quiet any users not connected over an ssl connection.

Webchat

WEBIRC has been enabled so that behind their hostmask, users can now be considered to be connecting from their real address. This means that a single ban format can apply to both direct connections and webchat connections.

For example, a user connecting from 171.205.18.52 will still appear as ‘nickname!abcd1234@gateway/web/freenode/ip.171.205.18.52′ but ban masks of the form ‘*!*@171.205.18.52′ will match! This is now the most effective method of matching users using webchat but the realname and hexip username are still available.

Although freenode’s webchat is available over SSL, the webchat’s localhost connection to the ircd is not SSL, so webchat users do not get user mode +Z. Webchat users will not be able to join a +S channel and will not match the $z extban, even if they are using webchat over SSL.

Security considerations

These channel modes can not guarantee secure communication in all cases; if you choose to rely on them, please understand what they can and can’t do, and what other security considerations there are.

There are a variety of known security problems with SSL, and reasons why the +S mode may not guarantee transport security on freenode. Some of these are:

  • These modes may be unset by channel operators at any time, allowing non-TLS/SSL users to join, and the mode may subsequently be reapplied;
  • If network splits occur it may also be possible for users to bypass +S intentionally or by chance;
  • Clients may be compromised or malicious, or using a malicious shared host;
  • Clients may have traffic intercepted as part of a Man In The Middle (MITM) attack and then transparently forwarded via SSL, invisibly to channel users;
  • There may be issues with TLS/SSL itself in server or client configuration or architecture which compromise its ability to provide effective transport security at the network level (there have been several published attacks against SSL recently – see here).

This is not an authoritative list, so before using +S as part of any channel which requires strong anonymity, please ensure you understand what it does and its drawbacks.

There are other security tools you may want to look at – you may want to consider using client plugins that provide additional encryption or route your connection through Tor. Tor also allows you to create spurious traffic to hide real traffic patterns. freenode provides its own hidden Tor node which means you can trust this connection as much as you trust freenode. Your IRC traffic with freenode via Tor is end-to-end encrypted from your Tor client to our Tor node. It does not pass through any third party nodes in unencrypted form.

Finally, unless you can trust everyone in a channel and are sure it is configured properly and you understand the other technical risks, do not rely on these channel modes exclusively. Security is generally layered; ensure you have good defense in depth and don’t rely on individual controls which may be a single point of failure.

Using other websites or services via Tor

Remember to always encrypt your traffic when using Tor as you have no control over who is running exit nodes and if they are doing traffic analysis on them. While your traffic to the exit node is encrypted and the ingress node can not read it, the exit node will always need to be able to remove Tor encryption. If your traffic is clear-text said exit node will be able to read it.

Over 9000 * 10

freenode has been growing slowly and steadily, breaking the next practically-useless-but-still-kinda-neat barrier of more than 90,000 concurrent connections at the same time. It’s very nice, and humbling, to know that we are able to enable so many people to communicate with each other.

I shouldn’t have added a month of leeway at the last second to my last prediction so the scary scary 100,000 is officially targeted for May 2014. Yes, the pace at which freenode is growing seems to be increasing ever so slightly.

Historic posts for those of you keeping track:

http://blog.freenode.net/2007/08/freenode-has-reached-40-000-users/

http://blog.freenode.net/2008/09/50000-active-users/

http://blog.freenode.net/2009/12/happy-new-year-2010/

http://blog.freenode.net/2011/01/freenode-70k/

http://blog.freenode.net/2012/04/80k/

The good, the bad, and the ugly…

Firstly, I would like to apologise for the interruptions the network has experienced in the last week (and continues to experience as we speak). I would also like to thank our incredible server sponsors for the time and dedication they have shown in helping us attempt to deal with the situation.

Sponsors — sponsors are the lifeblood of the network; without sponsors there would be no freenode. Unfortunately, the recent attacks have been significant enough for some of our sponsors to pull the plug as they were unable to continue providing the same level of assistance to the network as they had in the past. These kind of attacks can be costly for our sponsors; the disruptions soon have a financial impact for sponsors and their paying clients when service is disrupted. They are also costly in time and resources spent trying to alleviate the issues caused within their networks. To those of our sponsors who have had to discontinue sponsorship, in part or in full, I would like to thank you for the years of support. Not just for freenode but for the Free and Open Source Software Communities and we can only apologise for the difficulties your organisations have experienced as a result of these recent attacks.

Free and Open Source Software Communities — whilst sponsors may be the lifeblood of the network, the FOSS communities are our reason for being. Unfortunately they, along with our sponsors, are the ones suffering at the hands of the attacker(s) — it is their projects that are disrupted and affected and we can only apologise for the instability and disruption experienced by projects on the network in this last week.

freenode — ironically freenode is the puzzle piece that gets off lightly. We’re just a bunch of people passionate about FOSS — the network itself is devoid of feeling and whilst our volunteers do their best dealing with the aftermath of the attacks and try to keep the network up and running the reality is that in the grand scheme of things freenode is nothing. freenode is just a means to an end; the projects that have chosen to use freenode could easily go elsewhere, the volunteers who staff the network… well, they could easily go wherever their projects went — we volunteer for freenode because we’re passionate about FOSS, and the majority of us also contribute to one or several FOSS projects or have done in the past. For us it has never been about “freenode” — it has been about FOSS; and the projects we, as individuals, care about. We are all freenode users first, and staffers second.

If there was no freenode, there would be other alternatives — perhaps similar alternatives, perhaps very different alternatives. The FOSS communities are full of talented, passionate people and I have no doubt that we’d all find different ways to stay in touch and work on our projects even if there was no freenode.

That’s not to say we’re about to throw in the towel — we’ve all invested a lot of time and effort in the network and I am sure we will continue to do so for as long as there are projects wanting to use it and sponsors willing to help us.

I wish I could provide you with detailed information about the attacks and the cause of them — but these details are but a mystery to us and with nearly 90,000 users I’d be loathe to speculate as to who we might have annoyed… or how. For the time being, we intend to continue mitigating attacks where possible and continuing to endeavour to provide service as usual!

Once more, thank you for the support and the faith in the project — and thank you for the patience whilst our infrastructure team desperately tries to juggle our infrastructure around to bring back as much of our normal services as is possible at this point in time.

April 1st 2013, the aftermath

It’s been a little more than a week since we started our April Fools quiz this year; thanks to everybody who participated.

The first ten people who completed all three tracks are, in descending order of aprilness:

  • jojo
  • homerj
  • AndrewF
  • stereo`
  • ditzydoo
  • talisein
  • nebkat
  • timgoh0
  • Aster
  • PyroPeter

 

Here are the riddles and their solutions, in the original order:

Misc

  1. ###>++++++++++ [>++++++++++>+++++++++++>+++++++++++>+++++++++++>++++++++++><<<<<<-] >+>++>++++>+>+++> <<<<<< >.>.>.>.>.
    • This was brainfuck code, writing eprog to stdout
    • ###eprog
  2. #####9466848004102444800
    • This was a range between two unix timestamps, from 1.1.2000 until 1.1.2100 (midnight)
    • #####century
  3. ##### 277453665
    • This level was slightly harder, on a phone keyboard (according to TU-T E.161) writing with these numbers spelled aprilfool (with some guessing or T9)
    • #####aprilfool
  4. http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oHg5SJYRHA0
    • The beloved Rick Roll video. This was a joke idea, the channel ########gotyou was actually hidden as a channel forward (mode +f)
    • ########gotyou
  5. ###### BOGBOS, SEAPHXDENDALMSP, CPTOSL, SCLBOSCPTARN
    • Similar to last years keyboard riddle, you had to connect the airports on a map which formed the letters I W I N.
      • Bogota to Boston: I
      • Seattle to Phoenix to Denver to Dallas to Saint Paul: W
      • Cape Town to Oslo: I
      • Santiago to Boston to Cape Town to Stockholm: N
    • ######iwin

The topic in ######iwin was: Congratulations, you finished the misc track. Here, have a puzzle piece: It’s dangerous to go alone! Take this! ###the. Make sure to also play the other quiz tracks!

Music

The list number references the level number of the listed question.

  1. What does Dorothy wish she was on the other side of?
    • ##rainbow
    • Referencing: Dorothy from the The Wizard of Oz sings “Somewhere Over the Rainbow.”
  2. What is the first thing Rick Astley will never give up?
    • ##you
    • Referencing: Never Gonna Give You Up by Rick Astley.
    • Source
  3. This person can’t touch “this.”
    • ##mchammer
    • Referencing: U Can’t Touch This by MC Hammer.
  4. This old song leaves many people wondering what the writers had wrote it about. Most people think the song is about drugs, however the group has said in interviews that it didn’t really have any meaning at all.
    • ##hotelcalifornia
    • Referencing: Hotel California by the Eagles.
    • Source
  5. This 1975 classic is fairly self-explanatory.
    • ##bohemianrhapsody
    • Referencing: Bohemian Rhapsody by Queen.
  6. The main character, a kid, in this classic music video was mocked for being “this”.
    • ##poet
    • Referencing: Another Brick in the Wall by Pink Floyd, specifically Part 1.
    • This question seemed to trip up the most people, as it was the most vague question.
  7. We reminisces about the good ole days of when those popular in music were radio stars.
    • ##buggles
    • Referencing: Video Killed the Radio Star by The Buggles.
    • This was the official answer for Level 8, however, as someone pointed out the official name of the band is “The Buggles.”
  8. Michael Jackson’s most popular song predicts this future event that is popular on the Internet as an event worth preparing for.
    • ##zombieapocalypse
    • Referencing: Thriller by Michael Jackson.
    • This one was a tad tricky as the answer was not in the lyrics of the song.
  9. This 80′s song was very controversial when it came out, offending several people, including average working people. It is often censored on the radio when played.
    • ##moneyfornothing
    • Referencing: Money For Nothing by Dire Straits.
    • More about the controversy.
  10. The most popular guitar riff is from the beginning of this group’s most popular song.
    • ##deeppurple
    • Referencing: Smoke on the Water by Deep Purple.
  11. This band was the first band to have three consecutive multi-platinum albums.
    • ##styx
    • Referencing: The Grand Illusion, Pieces of Eight, Cornerstone, and Paradise Theatre. These albums have been certified Multi-Platinum by the RIAA.

The /topic in ##styx was: Congratulations! | You have answered all the music trivia correctly. | Make you to play the other quizzes and you’ll need this for later, ###best

Crypto

The list number references the level number of the listed question.

  1. Blog post of ##bhggbyhapu
    • This is a simple ROT13 cipher
    • where AtoN, BtoO, CtoP, etc.
    • python -c “print ‘bhggbyhapu’.decode(‘rot13′)”
    • The answer is: ##outtolunch
  2. pTShnJAmo3W0
    • This is base64 encoded then ROT13′ed.
    • python -c “print ‘pTShnJAmo3W0′.decode(‘rot13′).decode(‘base64′)”
    • The answer is: ##panicsort
  3. http://i.imgur.com/AArVy5H.png
  4. QOZTMLUVG IPAJGECYZ | Don’t forget to nT92MKV= | orange
    • QOZTMLUVG IPAJGECYZ
    • nT92MKV=
      • This is the same as the previous level, rot13′ed and then base64′ed.
      • python -c “‘nT92MKV=’.decode(‘rot13′).decode(‘base64′)”
      • hover
    • If you hover over the comic on https://xkcd.com/944/ you’ll see:
      • After exhausting the OED, we started numbering them. When overlapping hurricanes formed at all points on the Earth’s surface, and our scheme was foiled by Cantor diagonalization, we just decided to name them all “Steve”. Your local forecast tomorrow is “Steve”. Good luck.
        • This next step is a bit of a leap, but we expected you to search for key phrases in the string. You should end up on Cantor’s diagonal argument on wikipedia. From here you’ll see some description of it. We want the most popular example of Cantor’s diagonal argument, which is Russell’s Paradox. (Can a set of all sets contain itself?)
    • The answer is ##russell’sparadox
  5. http://git.io/Y60F5g | 936 | UHG | NZCBXBXUSXDBXIWZWMMLLVLHM | WEQ | I’m So Meta Even This Acronym | freenode | 12 | ♥
    • The /topic changed a little bit during the game. This is the most recent form.
    • Hints given:
      • 2013-04-01 18:51:18 <yano> i think you should focus more on how you “cracked” the code for the last
      • 2013-04-01 18:51:32 <yano> and by code i mean, QOZTMLUVG IPAJGECYZ
      • 2013-04-01 18:52:12 <yano> UHG and WEG are pretty important
      • 2013-04-02 04:13:28 <yano> it is vigenere
      • 2013-04-02 05:42:38 <yano> one more semi-important hint: UHG | NZCBXBXUSXDBXIWZWMMLLVLHM | WEQ are each encrypted with the same KEY and method
    • The last hint pretty much gave it away for many people.
    • UHG | NZCBXBXUSXDBXIWZWMMLLVLHM | WEQ
      • This is vigenère again.
      • The key is IRC ROT12-ed.
        • IRC is expected to come from the reference of I’m So Meta Even This Acronym and freenode as in an acronym of/about freenode.
        • The 12 comes from the number directly in the /topic.
        • UGH decrypts to
          • AES
        • NZCBXBXUSXDBXIWZWMMLLVLHM decrypts to
          • TWOHUNDREDANDFIFTYSIXBITS
        • WEQ decrypts to
          • CBC
      • Now, let’s take a break and follow a pattern from previous levels. Let’s pull up https://xkcd.com/936
        • This should be obvious given the previous pattern of XKCD being involved in these levels.
      • While viewing that you should probably download http://git.io/Y60F5g
        • wget http://git.io/Y60F5g
      • Y60F5g is encrypted with AES-256-CBC. This is provided by the previous clues.
      • The key for the encrypted file is Tr0ub4dor&3
      • openssl enc -d -aes-256-cbc -a -in Y60F5g -out Y60F5g.plaintext
      • The output of the file is: ##K&R
    • The answer to this level is ##K&R

The topic in ##K&R was: Congratulations! You have completed freenode’s crypto challenge! | Make sure to also play the other quizzes, and take this with you ###est | http://git.io/TLfWTg

With ###the and ###best and ###est you are expected to put these pieces together to find ###thebestest

Congratulations to those who have completed all the tracks and levels!

Top 10

All times listed are in UTC.

Rank Nick Time
1 jojo 2013-04-02 06:04:34
2 homerj 2013-04-02 06:14:31
3 AndrewF 2013-04-02 06:42:53
4 Stereo` 2013-04-02 06:51:42
5 ditzydoo 2013-04-02 07:20:45
6 talisein 2013-04-02 08:06:23
7 nebkat 2013-04-02 08:24:36
8 jarick 2013-04-02 09:53:51
9 Sarah 2013-04-02 10:06:50
10 PyroPeter 2013-04-02 10:55:47

Lists

Those who have completed all the levels and made it to the final channel but didn’t make it in time for the top 10:

  • alex_joni
  • CeruleanSky
  • DonkeyHotei
  • erkin
  • fsckd
  • kaneda^
  • Kent
  • luckybunny
  • Martok
  • pekuja
  • Pixelz
  • PoohBear
  • Rutix
  • shino
  • slidercrank
  • stac
  • Tordek
  • Valodim

These people were elligible for our cloak lottery, where we used a piece of code to randomly pick three people to win a cloak. Those people were: fsckd, Rutix, and stac.

Top 10 For Each Track

All times are listed in UTC.

Misc

Rank Nick time
1 Xneby 2013-03-31 20:19:19
2 Stereo` 2013-03-31 20:25:27
3 AndrewF 2013-03-31 20:31:31
4 FireFly 2013-03-31 20:36:28
5 ubuntor 2013-03-31 20:38:47
6 thommey 2013-03-31 20:40:30
7 luckybunny 2013-03-31 20:44:34
8 lastplacer 2013-03-31 20:48:33
9 Pixelz 2013-03-31 20:50:20
10 Mortomes 2013-03-31 20:51:10

Music

Rank Nick time
1 grawity 2013-03-31 22:00:47
2 PoohBear 2013-03-31 22:32:45
3 nikis 2013-03-31 22:37:01
4 CeruleanSky 2013-03-31 22:37:32
5 ss 2013-03-31 23:31:32
6 AndrewF 2013-04-01 00:01:47
7 Kent 2013-04-01 00:05:03
8 carharttjimmy 2013-04-01 00:07:31
9 Sarah 2013-04-01 00:09:11
10 fsckd 2013-04-01 00:09:49

Crypto

Rank Nick time
1 jojo 2013-04-02 03:30:13
2 homerj 2013-04-02 06:12:04
3 AndrewF 2013-04-02 06:41:25
4 Stereo` 2013-04-02 06:43:39
5 ditzydoo 2013-04-02 07:12:06
6 talisein 2013-04-02 08:05:32
7 nebkat 2013-04-02 08:21:49
8 shino 2013-04-02 09:21:46
9 jarick 2013-04-02 09:52:16
10 Sarah 2013-04-02 10:05:44